Tag Archives: paris art

The Colonel and the Muse Part II

7 Dec

It had been 3 days now since things had gone south with Muse Leira—she wanted Lala Drona out, out of that room as soon as possible.  Never had she ever met an artist so enveloped by her own work, so committed to her own style and message, an artist with vision alright…with tunnel vision. 

Muse Leira tried, time and time again, to inspire Lala Drona to continue her and Colonel Morgado’s work with battle strategies. She tried to influence Lala to wage art war on the Art Guild: the legislation which passed all art-related laws.   When that didn’t work, She tried to influence the artist to strategise against those who did not believe in art.  She tried to convince Lala of the destructive force that she possessed when she put paintbrush to canvas.  Muse Leira’s work with Colonel Morgado had been left unfinished, and she wanted Lala, more than any other artist to have entered that room before, to implement the battle strategies that Leira and the Colonel had started, into her paintings.

Lala Drona refused to accept the muse’s battle inspiration, and arrogantly explained to Muse Leira how this creative collaboration would unfold.  Lala had already decided on a concept, and merely needed the muse to help her develop the images for it.   The concept for the triptych of paintings would examine the development of online relationships/friendships, from the digital to the real.   It would unfold over three parts on three canvases:

Canvas 1:  “We Find Our Match in the Digital Masses”

Canvas 2: “We Give Each Other Space to Grow”

Canvas 3: “Together, We Make Each Other Human”

“Together we make each other human?  What’s so great about being human anyway?” Leira said.

Lala explained. “I meant for “human” to be taken metaphorically…like coming together in real life is what helps us maintain our humanity— or our compassion—empathy…”

“You are insinuating that “humanity” only expresses a compassionate side—while today more than ever we are witnessing humanity’s “inhumanity”. Not to mention, that idea is corny.  It would be a disservice to the entire triptych.  I’ll sign off on the first two ideas, but the third has got to go.”

Lala laughed, “I don’t think you really understand your role here.”

“Role?  You will suffer if you chose to stay in this room and not implement my inspiration.”

Lala scoffed and ignored the muse.  She threw herself into the work, but her ideas did not flow; she felt creatively blocked.  Sketching the third idea was like trying to manoeuvre a paintbrush with her toes.  The images would not translate onto paper.  But Lala kept drawing, too committed to her method.

Through the night, Lala persisted with her work but not without rebellion from Muse Leira.  Over the next few nights, Leira appeared to the dog outside Lala’s room.  At first, the barking only distracted Lala slightly, as she told herself that she would get used to it, just as she got used to the other sounds of the town.

Hours upon hours, the dog barked outside of her window, a rhythmic barking that ricocheted off the walls of the colonel’s room—every burst of canine scream was a wack over Lala’s ears. Muse Leira appeared over Lala as she drew, willing her own inspiration into the artist’s mind.  The more Lala resisted, the more Leira’s inspiration would change shape and become stronger.  With every wave of inspiration, Lala’s drawing began to warp and transform as well, into circles and lines, a battle strategy that she could not decipher.

The church bells clanged, the roosters cooed and every dog in that town barked simultaneously in the same rhythmic pattern. Lala covered her ears and screamed as an image of Muse Leira and Colonel Morgado emerged from a white fog with their troops behind them.  Flashes of bloodshed, of flesh in the air, a mix or white and red coalesced into a pink cloud.  They marched on through the pink fog…then, as quickly as it came, the image went dark again.  A new image came into Lala’s mind.  The artist, followed by her drones and muses, sitting atop a globe, sitting atop with someone she had never met before…working together towards a common goal. 

Lala began drawing the new image, and as she drew, the cacophony outside dulled; it subsided. Muse Leira appeared at her side with a hesitant smile.  Lala finished the drawing, but just as her pencil left the paper, the noise started up again.

Lala covered her ears and Muse Leira peered closer at the new concept for the third painting.  She read the title below:

Canvas 3: “Together, We Conquer the World.”

Muse Leira couldn’t have been happier with the results of their collaboration—she thought of Colonel Morgado, their late nights together planning their battle strategies, side by side like in Lala’s drawing.  Before the Colonel’s death, Muse Leira thought that they would one day conquer the world, and now through Lala Drona’s piece, in some way, they had. 

Muse Leira looked up from the sketch, and found Lala packing her bags.  The barking had stopped outside, but continued to pulsate through Lala’s mind. 

“The barking in my head won’t stop.” Lala said.  Lala held her head and threw her backpack over her shoulder.  She smiled.  “And I think our work here is done.”  She approached Muse Leira, who was standing in front of the door of the room.  Lala stood there, canvases under her arms, and looking Leira up and down.  She took a deep breath and then hugged her. “Thank you, Leira…for everything— I know I’m not easy to work with, and my inspiration extraction techniques are unconventional, but I knew you could do it all along.”  Lala patted Leira on the shoulder.  “Well done.”  Lala sighed, pushed through the doorway, and ventured into the night. 

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Exhibition: Narcisse Obligé

10 Oct

Lala Drona to appear in collective exhibition “Narcisse Obligé” at La Savonnette Electrique next weekend October 15th-16th, and during the rest of the month by appointment only.

Ken Phak interviews Lala about her work and upcoming exhibition in The L.D. Times magazine.  Mirror, Mirror- L.D. Times article 2016.

LD Times October 2016, Mirror Mirror

La Politesse.

6 May

In the form of video performance, Lala Drona recounts her personal experience living abroad.  After moving to Paris, France in 2012, Lala films herself performing in French for the very first time.

She speaks with her face blanketed in flesh-colored mesh; she pulls and pushes through the material, illustrating the tension between the “natural” and “foreign” behaviours she experiences abroad.  The camera frame often segments parts of the face, zooming in on her mouth in order to draw focus to her words.  The video successfully transmits an oppressive ambience, the pressures of living up to societal norms when immersing yourself into a new culture.

Based on a Fact

Damian Fuller, Minimalism and Manners Blog

 

The Penelope Show: Muse Pink

28 Mar

BOAFMusePINK           During the past few years, artist Lala Drona has surprised and stunned us with her artwork and unconventional artistic philosophy.  However, we rarely ask Dali and Galaabout the inspiration behind such products.  The concept of the muse originates from Greek mythology; they are the goddesses which inspire literature, science and the arts.
Some famous muse/artist duos to be noted are Dalí and his wife Gala, Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady, and Robert Mapplethorpe and Patti Smith.  Although the modern day use of the term muse describes someone or something that inspires an artist writer or musician, Lala Drona has taken the concept a bit further.
In The Lala World (Lala Drona’s artistic universe), muses are consultants that provide a service to artists and individuals.  Jack and nealBefore Muses created their own unions, there were neither official contracts nor protection provided to them by the State.  After much struggle, legislation was passed to give Muses rights and compensation for their work.  However, some artists and muses continue to work off the books and receive their compensation under the table.  Lala Drona and her Muses are some of the few who continue this tradition.
Why would artists and Muses prefer to keep their business off the books?  Perhaps artists and muses with unconventional artistic practices don’t want the authorities affecting their processes.  Perhaps certain muses and artists negotiate non-monetary compensation for their services?  Penelope from The Penelope Show explores the concept of muse with Muse Pink, a muse known to have worked with artist Lala Drona.  See the video below.

Lala’s prepares exhibition for October this year.

24 Mar

Update on new painting by Lala Drona

Just in, Lala Drona is confirmed to participate in a collective exhibition in Paris this October.  The names of the ten other artists have not yet been released.  The inspiration for the triptych that Lala will create was inspired by her last Lala Laboratory experiment, where she fed one of her Drones to a Muse. Lala Drona has decided to depict the story of how she and the Breast Series are connected and how she has used these images/story to create the artist we know today.

Stay tuned for more information on Lala’s coming exhibition.

Based on a Fact

Lala Feeds Drone #1 to the Muses

10 Jan

Lala Feeds Drone #1 to the MusesContrary to belief that the Lala Laboratory had been shut down, Lala releases photographs of her latest art experiment: What happens when we feed a Drone to a Muse?

The Lala laboratory is where Lala Drona collaborates with other Drones and conducts controversial research on Muse inspiration extraction.  Lala’s controversial methods have always included Muse abuse, but why has she now decided to turn on her Drones?Close-up

Last month, Lala Drona banished Drone #1 from The Lala World due to a breach of contract:

Drone Code #1: Drones will be loyal to Drones, Drone will be loyal to Lala.

Lala has since filmed herself ceremonially burning Drone #1’s name tag: a symbol of his expulsion from The Lala World.

When Drone #1 abandoned the project, Lala said she would, “feed Drone #1 to the Muses.”  However, in a statement released yesterday morning, Lala stated, “I originally said it as a joke, but then I thought of the possibilities.  What kind of inspiration could be produced if a Muse ate a Drone?  …Drone #1’s banishment would not be in vain.”

Drone #1's Name tag.  Burned in youtube video.

Drone #1’s Name tag. Burned in youtube video.

Lala is still waiting for conclusive results from the Drone-Muse experiment, but says that results produced so far have both “amazed and shocked” her.  Journalists everywhere are keeping an eye on Drone web forums in hopes of finding reactions to Lala’s new experiment.  Have they accepted the brutal removal of their Drone comrade?  Or has Lala gone too far this time?  Stay tuned as we uncover more secrets from within the Lala Laboratory.

Based on a Fact

Trouble in Paradise

21 Dec

GoodbyeDrone1

P.E.D.:  Post Exhibition Depression.  This syndrome is a consequence of the rise in cortisone levels and surge of endorphins produced in the body to deal with the stress of the pre-exhibition process.  After the exhibition, artists experience a sort of “come down” from this self-produced drug high.

Life after the exhibition From the Bed to the Lab has been far from easy.  Lala has confirmed that she is suffering from P.E.D. and plans to “relax and spend time with friends and family during this difficult period.”  However, her attempts to lay low have not been successful.

Lala with her loyal Drones.

Lala with her loyal Drones.

During the exhibition take-down, a fight broke out between Lala Drona and Drone #1.  Lala was reported threatening to “feed Drone #1 to the Muses.”  The reason for the blow out is unknown, but unconfirmed sources say the Drone #1 just never felt at home in The Lala World, and “needed a break for soul searching.”  Lala has released a statement saying that her and Drone #1 would no long be working together due to artistic differences.

When asked if she would be looking for a replacement, Lala said no, and that she would be retiring the number 1.  However, she is not saving the title in hopes that Drone #1 will return.  For the most part, The Lala World has an open door policy.  Collaborators enter and leave as they please.  However, once recruited by the Army of Drones, under contract, one is required to be loyal to Lala and other Drones.  Any form of mission abandonment is a breach of contract and results in a permanent surrender of one’s Drone title.

Journalists have tried interviewing other Drones to hear their opinion on the situation, but all have managed to remain silent.  When questioned about Drone #1’s banishment from Lala World, Lala stated, “Drone #1 in not banished.  He can return, but he can never return as a Drone.”

Based on a Fact.

Kevin Thurman, Journalist for Psychology Weekly Magazine   

Lala Drona at Vogue Fashion Night Out

20 Sep

Lala Drona was spotted this week at Paris’ Vogue Fashion Night Out, sipping champagne with DJ Mafe from Maracuyeah.

Lala’s one phone call: L.D. Times Jail Interview

28 Jul

Just released from Paris Art Prison, an interview with Lala Drona by Natacha Young from the L.D. Times.  Photography by Shutupi.

Jail Interview Spread

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