Tag Archives: lala drona artist

Artist Family Values: Lala begins research

26 Sep
Lala Drona spotted at exhibition in Paris
Lala Drona spotted at exhibition

In an interview with Art & Stylin’ Magazine, Lala Drona said that she has been “taking a break from output to reassess.”  The artist stated that she continues to work on creative projects, but in order to dive deeper into other projects, social media and blog posts had to be put on the back-burner:

“I’ve reduced my output online because of my commitment to essential projects offline. I came to the realization that in my journey as an artist, my values seem to be holding me back, creatively and otherwise. The troubling thing is, these values I speak of, arise, and stop me from moving forward; they are walls that do not explain themselves. I’ve realized that for better or worse, these values have been transmitted to me, through exterior sources. I’ve never taken a moment to work through the voices policing me to be a “good” person, or “good” artist. Because I like the person I have become, and I like the life I lead today, I have never thoroughly investigated the origins of these “values.” Now that I am an adult, and no longer a young person clutching on to stable things in an unstable reality, it’s time to unpack them. I’ve decided to begin writing about my values as an artist, to find out what it means to be an artist today in this new world.”

Thibaut Narme spotted in Paris at Au Chat Noir with Lala Drona
Thibaut Narme, Economics Lecturer and friend of Lala Drona

Lala Drona was spotted at Au Chat Noir interviewing Thibaut Narme, a lecturer at a business school in Paris.  Sources say that Lala Drona was researching for a section of the essay that examines free market capitalism and the role of the artist within it.  She mentioned other topics in the essay would include Death to the bohemian artist and The young and the mature artist.

“My European Art Tour was enlightening.  I feel like I’m finally seeing everything from outside myself—starting to see the strings of how everything works—I’ve been seemingly invited to the game my whole life, but it’s only now that I finally understand the rules. I’ve definitely had to take an unconventional path to get them.  Now, I’m finally getting ready to play.”

For some experts, these statements raise red flags.  As Lala Drona has not yet left the doghouse regarding her reputation involving allegations of muse abuse.  However, after her stint in Paris Art Prison, she seems to have turned over a new leaf, committing herself to use everything she’s learned through her experiences (and muse experiments!) to help her fellow artists.

Lala Drona is also preparing for participation in the group exhibition “Turtle Bienvenu” at the Cité des Arts in Paris—the opening on October 12th from 6pm-11pm.  Lala Drona plans to continue her exploration of the female gaze, in the form of painting on canvas and in a video performance.  Don’t miss her first show since returning to Paris.

Newest video, desire or self-destruction?

20 Jul
Lala Drona photo from art performance shaving video "Willing"

Lala Drona’s latest performance video titled “Willing” has just been released.  The performance examines desire, choice, and notions of consent.  Critic Leanne Richmond stirred up media response with her recent reading of Lala Drona’s video, stating that, for her, the video is about “the inability to resist self-destructive behaviour.”  Based on a Fact caught up with Lala to learn more about the inspiration behind the video performance:

Lala Drona photo from art performance shaving video "Willing"

Lala Drona was inspired by ideas surrounding consent.  “I was thinking about the complexities of sexuality and society, and how in order to receive consent, we must in some way, already trespass.  In my video, this is demonstrated by how you cannot see the answer (yes or no) until the irreversible move is made by shaving.  Unwanted advances, verbal and physical, are seen as harassment (regardless of gender).  However, without them, we do not know how to begin advances towards what we want.  In a similar vein, this notion of obtaining consent is not at all new to women.  We have been systematically programmed to ask for consent to speak, consent to be part of to the team, consent to just be in the room.  Women asking men to start including it in their sexual practices is really nothing in comparison.”

Lala Drona photo from art performance shaving video "Willing"

Lala Drona mentions that the title “Willing” is not meant to be understood at face value, and is meant to be taken as humour au second degré.

Nonetheless, art critic Leanne Richmond theorised that “since Lala Drona is the only individual in the piece, this is really a piece about identity and the psyche.  The performer is asking and receiving consent from herself.  This demonstrates the loving and destructive acts we commit on ourselves.  In the video, although the performer’s psyche is saying “stop” (on the skin of her head), she is unable to resist the temptation to self-destructive behaviour, shown by the shaving of the rest of her hair.”

What do you think about Lala Drona’s newest art performance video? 

Performance at Le Castel to promote NEW Laboratory

5 Jun
Painting by Lala Drona "Speak or Listen" Acrylic on canvas 50cm x 60cm Paris France, 2018 in performance at Le Castel in Paris
Title: Speak or Listen, Acrylic on canvas 50cm x 60cm

Last week, Lala Drona brought down the house with her debut performance in French at Le Castel, a private club  located in the 6th arrondissement of Paris. 

Le Castel was founded by the French event coordinator, Jean Castel in 1962.  Many knew Jean Castel as “le roi des nuits parisiennes” (the king of Parisian nights), Private performances, artist-types and parties continue to roll through this institution today.   In the basement of the building, there are sofas and chairs surrounding a stage. On the stage last week, the painting titled “Speak of Listen” by Lala Drona was displayed.  Performance artist Wenjue Zhang, placed black boxes containing peep-holes around the room.  Inside said boxes, lied an image, erotic and explicit…saturated in colour.  Hypnotic music began to play in the background, and Lala Drona stepped onto the stage… (video below).

Lala Drona’s performance titled “Experiment 88: Speak or Listen” recounts an artist’s (Jade Edwards’) experience in Lala Laboratories.  The artist is the subject in an experiment that will result in artistic revelation (article continues below):

Video still from Lala Drona art performance "Experiment 88: Speak or Listen" at Le Castel in Paris.
still from performance at Le Castel

Sources say that this performance serves as an advertisement for the new Lala Laboratory.  Since 2014, Lala has had quite a bit of trouble due to her unconventional inspiration extraction methods from muses.  She has gone to Art Prison, inspired muse protests and strikes, and inadvertently caused changes in muse rights legislature. After the Lala Laboratory explosion in 2016, Lala Drona has simultaneously been looking for a place to put down roots, whilst also dodging investigations into inhumane Lala Laboratory experiments.

Video still from Lala Drona art performance "Experiment 88: Speak or Listen" at Le Castel in Paris.
still from performance at Le Castel

Since 2017, Lala Drona has been traveling the world in the form of an exhibition tour.  She stated last week, “I’ve been traveling in order to look for a new place for Lala Laboratories. And finally, I’ve found it.”  Lala Laboratories, formerly “The Lala Laboratory” had to change its name due to copyright issues, but according to Lala, that wasn’t the only change that took place. “Lala Laboratories no longer includes muses in their research and experiments.  After the protests, the project got a bad rap.  It was almost impossible to get anything done due to new bureaucracy and protections.  Now, thanks to the former muse experiments, we’ve collected all the data that we need, and it’s time to open our experiments to their proper demographic.  Now, Lala Laboratories serves to enhance artist inspiration and methods, through experiences catered to each individual artist.  The performance at Le Castel was a simulation of that…sort of an advertisement for the new laboratory, if you will.”

When questioned about the location of Lala Laboratories, Lala explained: “It took going all over the world, and encountering every problem imaginable to get to the solution.  Lala Laboratories has installed itself in the intangible: in the virtual spaces online, in every conversation, and in every collaboration and project connecting to us.  If you have interacted with myself, my Drones, muses, and my community in any way, you ARE part of Lala Laboratories.”

The Beard: Lala’s newest video gets hairy

13 May
Lala Drona's video "The Beard" from her series La Minute Ladrona.  Explores the the history of the beard and the contemporary and metaphorical beard.

Just released, Lala Drona’s newest art video “The Beard,” makes waves amongst the digital masses (video below). The newest instalment in her video series La Minute Ladrona (the stolen minute) has fans deliberating the true meaning behind the video.

Lala Drona and Jamika Ajalon who contributed a vocal clip to "The Beard" art video.
Lala Drona with Jamika Ajalon

The artist covers topics in beard history, possibly linking beard trends to the different waves of women’s liberation. She unpacks the contemporary and metaphorical beard in a playful and enigmatic way.

The video stays true to Lala Drona’s iconic style. Moving video interacts with static digital image, while she whispers poetry over a black backdrop. However, this piece takes a documentary-style spin, diving into the beard as historical artefact, and looking into its influence on society as a whole. For the first time in the video series, Lala Drona incorporates audio from other authors/vocalists: one cameo by performance artist Jamika Ajalon, recorded specifically for this project.

Video still from "The Beard" the latest instalment in Lala Drona's video art series La Minute Ladrona (the stilen minute).  Lala Drona with Drone No.1
Video still from “The Beard”

A series first, Lala Drona also collaborated with someone else during the performance part of the video project. “What makes this video groundbreaking [within the series] is that Lala Drona shares the screen with someone else! Drone No.1 from the Lala’s created universe has crossed over into the La Minute Ladrona Series! Long live Drone No. 1!!!!” (digitalfire58, Dronauniverse Forum).

Internet meme of Drone No.1 "When your gf's new bf looks like a love child between you and her." Image from Lala Drona's new video "The Beard"
Internet beard meme of Drone No.1 "The magic is in the beard"

Drone No.1, a favourite in the Lala Drona Universe, has caused fans to come out of the woodwork, reminiscing on the Drone No.1 saga, and praising his return in the form of internet memes.

Not surprisingly, the appearance of Drone No.1 has inspired conspiracy theories that Lala Drona will soon return to her work on the Lala Laboratory, after a long pause due to her European Art Tour. Others speculate on how this video came about, pointing to the easter eggs left in social media posts from Lala Drona’s European travels.

Either way, we are impressed with the trailblazing evolution of her work. This video marks a stylistic shift. “The Beard” art video is a must-see. Below, a link to the video. We also suggest seeing all of the “La Minute Ladrona” video series found here.

Lala Drona Retrospective at MOMA?

25 Mar
Lala Drona imagining her work in the MOMA museum of modern art.  Female painter at Museum or Modern art.  Retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art New York.  This painting titled "Together, we conquer the world."

Lala Drona’s European art tour has gone intercontinental.  Following her art residency in Gothenburg, Sweden, the artist was spotted in New York visiting galleries and museums, along with rubbing elbows with members of the art world in cafés and bars.  From the Guggenheim to the Whitney, and finally the MOMA, Lala Drona was spotted taking notes and photos of the spaces, supposedly planning her future retrospective exhibition in these institutions.

Lala Drona retrospective at the MOMA museum of modern art new york.  Imagining how her work will look in the MOMA.  This painting titled "The First Follower."  Contemporary female painter.

            One of our reporters caught up with the artist at the MOMA:

J: Why have you chosen to research the MOMA as a possible host for your future retrospective?

L.D.:  Before arriving to NYC, my heart was set on the MOMA.  However, I admire the risks that the Guggenheim takes, and would love for the retrospective to be shown there first.  After this, it will travel around the world. The first stop will be in France, at Palais de Tokyo.  Since my work includes photo collage, video and paintings, I think the spaces that Palais de Tokyo provides would be an ideal fit.  However, eventually one day, I would like my retrospective to make its way back to NYC and appear in the MOMA.

J: Have you seen any pieces in the MOMA which have impacted you during this visit?

Lala Drona painter sees Gerhard Richter Baader-Meinhof art that changed my life
from series “Baader–Meinhof” by Gerhard Richter

L.D. I’ve finally seen Gerhard Richter’s paintings in real life.  His series  “Baader–Meinhof” has reinforced my faith in painting on canvas as a visual medium.  His innovative techniques are proof that there is still so much to explore and discover in the genre of painting.  When you stand in front of the paintings in real life, they move, they breathe.  It’s breathtaking.

J: What will you do with the rest of your time in NYC?

L.D.: I’ve got a full schedule.  I’m meeting with other artists and plotting for big things in the near future.

Lala Drona in film The Special People movie by Erica Schreiner art film
from film “The Special People” by Erica Schreiner

From emerging to established artists, Lala Drona trekked the city perpetually accompanied.  She was spotted visiting Chelsea galleries with Ezra Enzo, an abstract painter, soon to be fresh-out-of-art-school.  Around Brooklyn, she was reported to be deep in conversation with prominent video artist Erica Schreiner, and according to our sources, Lala Drona is scheduled to appear in Schreiner’s next feature length art film “The Special People.”  In addition to this, she will appear as one of the featured artists in an interview in Marietta Magazine, a Brooklyn based magazine which includes interviews with artists and performers from NYC to Paris.

Lala Drona interview in Marietta Magazine. Erica Schreiner Marietta Magazine with Lala Drona painter performance artist.
Lala Drona to be interviewed in Marietta Magazine’s next issue.

Since leaving New York, Lala Drona has travelled to an undisclosed location for rest and relaxation.  However, if history informs us of anything, it’s that this artist is not one to rest.  We speculate that she is in hiding so that she can plot her next voyage and project. We wait impatiently to find out in which new corner of the world Lala Drona will decide to plant her art-seed.

The Colonel and the Muse Part II

7 Dec

It had been 3 days now since things had gone south with Muse Leira—she wanted Lala Drona out, out of that room as soon as possible.  Never had she ever met an artist so enveloped by her own work, so committed to her own style and message, an artist with vision alright…with tunnel vision. 

Muse Leira tried, time and time again, to inspire Lala Drona to continue her and Colonel Morgado’s work with battle strategies. She tried to influence Lala to wage art war on the Art Guild: the legislation which passed all art-related laws.   When that didn’t work, She tried to influence the artist to strategise against those who did not believe in art.  She tried to convince Lala of the destructive force that she possessed when she put paintbrush to canvas.  Muse Leira’s work with Colonel Morgado had been left unfinished, and she wanted Lala, more than any other artist to have entered that room before, to implement the battle strategies that Leira and the Colonel had started, into her paintings.

Lala Drona refused to accept the muse’s battle inspiration, and arrogantly explained to Muse Leira how this creative collaboration would unfold.  Lala had already decided on a concept, and merely needed the muse to help her develop the images for it.   The concept for the triptych of paintings would examine the development of online relationships/friendships, from the digital to the real.   It would unfold over three parts on three canvases:

Canvas 1:  “We Find Our Match in the Digital Masses”

Canvas 2: “We Give Each Other Space to Grow”

Canvas 3: “Together, We Make Each Other Human”

“Together we make each other human?  What’s so great about being human anyway?” Leira said.

Lala explained. “I meant for “human” to be taken metaphorically…like coming together in real life is what helps us maintain our humanity— or our compassion—empathy…”

“You are insinuating that “humanity” only expresses a compassionate side—while today more than ever we are witnessing humanity’s “inhumanity”. Not to mention, that idea is corny.  It would be a disservice to the entire triptych.  I’ll sign off on the first two ideas, but the third has got to go.”

Lala laughed, “I don’t think you really understand your role here.”

“Role?  You will suffer if you chose to stay in this room and not implement my inspiration.”

Lala scoffed and ignored the muse.  She threw herself into the work, but her ideas did not flow; she felt creatively blocked.  Sketching the third idea was like trying to manoeuvre a paintbrush with her toes.  The images would not translate onto paper.  But Lala kept drawing, too committed to her method.

Through the night, Lala persisted with her work but not without rebellion from Muse Leira.  Over the next few nights, Leira appeared to the dog outside Lala’s room.  At first, the barking only distracted Lala slightly, as she told herself that she would get used to it, just as she got used to the other sounds of the town.

Hours upon hours, the dog barked outside of her window, a rhythmic barking that ricocheted off the walls of the colonel’s room—every burst of canine scream was a wack over Lala’s ears. Muse Leira appeared over Lala as she drew, willing her own inspiration into the artist’s mind.  The more Lala resisted, the more Leira’s inspiration would change shape and become stronger.  With every wave of inspiration, Lala’s drawing began to warp and transform as well, into circles and lines, a battle strategy that she could not decipher.

The church bells clanged, the roosters cooed and every dog in that town barked simultaneously in the same rhythmic pattern. Lala covered her ears and screamed as an image of Muse Leira and Colonel Morgado emerged from a white fog with their troops behind them.  Flashes of bloodshed, of flesh in the air, a mix or white and red coalesced into a pink cloud.  They marched on through the pink fog…then, as quickly as it came, the image went dark again.  A new image came into Lala’s mind.  The artist, followed by her drones and muses, sitting atop a globe, sitting atop with someone she had never met before…working together towards a common goal. 

Lala began drawing the new image, and as she drew, the cacophony outside dulled; it subsided. Muse Leira appeared at her side with a hesitant smile.  Lala finished the drawing, but just as her pencil left the paper, the noise started up again.

Lala covered her ears and Muse Leira peered closer at the new concept for the third painting.  She read the title below:

Canvas 3: “Together, We Conquer the World.”

Muse Leira couldn’t have been happier with the results of their collaboration—she thought of Colonel Morgado, their late nights together planning their battle strategies, side by side like in Lala’s drawing.  Before the Colonel’s death, Muse Leira thought that they would one day conquer the world, and now through Lala Drona’s piece, in some way, they had. 

Muse Leira looked up from the sketch, and found Lala packing her bags.  The barking had stopped outside, but continued to pulsate through Lala’s mind. 

“The barking in my head won’t stop.” Lala said.  Lala held her head and threw her backpack over her shoulder.  She smiled.  “And I think our work here is done.”  She approached Muse Leira, who was standing in front of the door of the room.  Lala stood there, canvases under her arms, and looking Leira up and down.  She took a deep breath and then hugged her. “Thank you, Leira…for everything— I know I’m not easy to work with, and my inspiration extraction techniques are unconventional, but I knew you could do it all along.”  Lala patted Leira on the shoulder.  “Well done.”  Lala sighed, pushed through the doorway, and ventured into the night. 

Goodbye beauty and into the Darkness

28 Aug

I am beautiful

Artist:  “How would you describe this painting?”

Viewer: “I like it, but it’s so dark.  Sort of bumming me out.”

Artist:  “Really? You think it’s dark?

"Dr. Royal" Paris 2013
“Dr. Royal” 2013, by Lala Drona

 

I have dedicated my entire life to creating art.  Spanning from paintings, to video, to performance art, to short fiction.  I believe that creating from the most personal, connects most universally.  However, words in the form of viewer-comments hover over my creations, descriptors like “suffering,” “painful,” and “dark.”

The funny thing is, I’ve always been embarrassed of my dark side showing, although it is the natural way I create.  I feel like I seem weak, too self-pitying or self-indulgent; I’m ruining your good time.  During the creative process, my mind and hand have made a pact to tone down the darkness, to try and make it more digestible through bright colors, or balanced/symmetrical design which is pleasing to the eye.

 

I look at my pieces now with suspicion.  My themes are dark, and most embody suffering, because that has been my reality.  The decision to aesthetically express darkness and suffering in a way that is pleasing to the eye

“Beautiful on the Inside” 2017, by Lala Drona

plays the role of propaganda and glamourizes a perpetual cycle of suffering.  It packages hard truths in a cruelty-free, sterile and overly-inspected product—something impersonal and all too easy for the mind to take in and forget, trauma-free.

The truth is, as a woman with my specific experience, I believe that I’ve expressed my darkness through the scope of beauty because I felt that this was the only way my experience had value.  I am beautiful, therefore I am.  Gaining and being rejected access to resources has been heavily based on my outward appearance and presentation ([un]attractive; woman), and has infiltrated the most sacred parts of my being, and now I’ve been creating from it.  The societal pressures to be “polite,” “make sure everyone’s having a good time,” and “keep it light” have only served to silence my voice and my art has suffered because of it.  I am aesthetically pleasing to them.  I am beautiful, therefore I am theirs.

Moyen No. 1
“Moyen No. 1” 2015 by Lala Drona

                  Confronting the darkness within, a darkness I believe we all have access to, and then unabashedly expressing it, is one of my greatest fears.  However, I have always believed that if something scares you, it is a sign that you are going in the right direction, so you must do it.  The darkness in my work seems to always peek through, and now its time to confront it and accept it fully.  To approach its truth.

 

“Doom and Destiny” 2017, by Lala Drona

I fear that I’ll lose a handle on reality when diving into the darkness and chaos.  I fear what I will discover, what doors I may open or whether I’ll be able to return from the madness.  However, I must reconcile this within myself, and so here today, I pledge to create something brazenly dark.  No protection, and no filters that make the message more digestible.

I will release myself from the external motivators, from the viewer-comments and the male-gaze.  I will neither be nice nor polite, and I definitely will not “keep it light.”  I will create something “ugly,” and I will make the viewer

The First Follower_20180225
“The First Follower” 2018, by Lala Drona

accompany me into the darkness.  Because We still exist without the mask of their “beauty.”  I will create something that aesthetically matches and communicates its message.  I will communicate truth.

Yes, I am beautiful, but I am not theirs.

 

See Lala Drona at her next exhibition in Paris at Galerie Art’et Miss in Paris, France– Sept. 8th 6pm-8pm.

invit-drona

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